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Nannuoshan 2013

sheng pu'er - gushu

An early spring Mao Cha, from old tea trees growing on Nannuo Shan, the mountain that inspired the name of our shop.

The dry leaves are green-grey in colour with sporadic shiny, downy buds. Infused, they give an intense brew; mellow, round and pleasantly astringent: a refreshing and thirst-quenching beverage.

 

What is Mao Cha?

Mao Cha –literally unfinished tea- is the name given to pu’er before it is compressed into cake. The fresh leaves are heated in a rotating drum or in a wok to prevent oxidation, then shaped into a long and tight form and sun-dried. Unlike green tea, which is dried at high temperature to deactivate all the enzymes responsible for oxidation, in Mao Cha there is still a small amount of enzyme responsible for a light oxidation during sun-drying.

Like Pu’er, Mao Cha is suitable for aging. Over the years, it gains depth, body and loose astringency. Not being compressed in a cake, Mao Cha ages faster than pu’er, as each leaf is in contact with air.

  • ORIGIN:  Nannuoshan, Menghai, Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, China
  • MEANING:  Nannuo mountain (nan nuo shan)
  • CULTIVAR:  Qiao Mu Da Ye Zhong
  • HARVEST TIME:  Early spring, 2013
  • TASTE:  Intense, brisk, slightly sweet

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Preparation
IN THE TEAPOT
  • Quantity: 6g / 500ml
  • Water temperature: 100°C
  • Infusion time: 4-5 min
GONGFU CHA METHOD
  • Quantity: 5-7g / 150ml
  • Water temperature: 100°C
  • 5-7 infusions: 5-20 sec.

Start with 5 seconds infusion time. Increase steadily to 20 seconds.
For best results in gongfu cha, brew in the traditional gaiwan or, even better, in a Yixing teapot. Too long steeping time would result in bitter taste.

Additional Information

This photo gallery illustrate the first steps of pu’er production.
The same day of the harvest the leaves are fired in a rotating drum or in a wok, heated by wood fire.

Right after firing, the leaves are scattered on the floor for airing.
Later on, the leaves are shaped into a long, tight form; either by machine or by hand.
The day after, in the early morning, the leaves are dried under the sun.
Once dried, they are ready to be consumed as Mao Cha or further compressed into cakes in a tea factory.

Thirsty for tea knowledge?

Our latest YouTube video:

JAPANESE HEI CHA: Tasting post-fermented Japanese teas and learning about this little-known category with Japanese tea expert Noli.

    DISCOVERING GOISHICHA & KUROCHA, the Japanese Hei Cha